Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Structural Thinkers: The Need for Closure

When I was a kid and would get into the occasional fight with a friend, and we would stop talking for a while, I was the one who broke the ice and asked the question: “Are we still friends?” I had to have an answer because I needed to know whether to move on or not.



According the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the definition of closure is: an often comforting or satisfying sense of finality…something (as a satisfying ending).

Dr. Geil Browning, Founder, Emergenetics International, defines a Structural Thinker as a person who is “practical and dependable…talent for drawing comparisons, looking for connections…likes to follow guidelines, agendas, procedures, and protocol…Similarly, if you want a really solid plan, ask someone who is highly Structural.”

There is no one that I can think of who can give you a better explanation about what it is like to be a structural thinker than me. I am all of these characteristics and bag of chips.

Today, I want to focus on the importance of closure to a structural thinker.


When I was a kid and would get into the occasional fight with a friend, and we would stop talking for a while, I was the one who broke the ice and asked the question: “Are we still friends?” I had to have an answer because I needed to know whether to move on or not.

When my manager gives me a project to work on, the last question I ask is: “When do you need this?”

Structural Thinkers don't like to leave things “out there.” The door must be closed. There must be a period. The well has to be capped.

2 comments:

  1. Me, too. When I am in meetings I always ask the question, "what is the date you need this by?" This makes so much sence to me but I realize now not to others.Guess we have to learn to laugh at ourselves when everyone cannot be like us.

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  2. Laughter is good for the soul, and so is a deadline. :)

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